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It’s eleven o-clock and I my train is leaving in little less than two hours when I to my surprise receive my recently ordered new Tripod-Head. Just in time, A Manfrotto Junior Geared Head.

I already gave up the thought that I will appear in time but luck was with me. I do a quick test with it and squeeze the tripod-head into my backpack and head off to the railway station from where my journey starts. It’s going to be a long trip. With a lot of waiting at airports and railway stations. 28 hours in total. I guess that’s the price one has to pay when traveling on a budget. But I have enough time to follow up with some podcasts.

The traveling itself turned out to be uneventful and trains, busses, flights, trains and more trains are to my surprise all on schedule and I arrive in Marazion just as planned and check-in into my apartment. After grabbing a well deserved drink and food I head out to take some few images in the not ideal overcast weather.

Luckily it get’s a little better to the end of the day. The weather forecast for the next few days goes from cloudy to sunny to cloudy and rain. Let’s see what happens.

Day 3

The alarm clock throws me out of the bed at 5 o’clock and after having a few instant coffee’s I head to St.Micheal’s Mount. Unfortunately the conditions aren’t right at the moment for the shot that I had in mind. The tide’s too high and the sky at the moment still too cloudy, or at least not the way I would like it to be. Anyway I keep exposing and hope for the best and after the outing I go back to have another nap.

The weather keeps on improving, and the sky fills with nice fluffy clouds and sun. I decide to take a walk along the paths to the east passing Cudden Point and down to Prussia Cove.

The more I walk the more beautiful the scenery becomes. Nice bays, lot’s of rocks. I’m stunned. The bays and coves are also getting bigger and bigger the more I walk it seems. The scenery is so beautiful, but the light is so harsh at the moment that it doesn’t make too much sense to take some pictures.

My walking leads me from one bay to another and every time I think “Maybe only this one more, and then I will try to ‘find’ some images” . But I continue walking and walking. My back and my feet start to hurt and I arrive in this beautiful cove and use the opportunity of the now slightly softer light to take a few images and a little rest.

Thinking that this location should be great at sunset I return to the location which I found on my way to here where I had some ideas for possible images. A group of ponys is grazing on the cliffs and start to pose for me a little.

Quickly they found out that I have nothing to eat on me, and they disappear again somewhere down the cliff.

I continue my walk to my first shot and wait for the sun to get closer to the horizon and hope it will illuminate the clouds in the sky with it’s warm light. Unfortunately the clouds which have been present the whole day, disappear right in time and leaving the sky now in a plain blue. Too bad. I do some exposures and head down to another location.

I learn my first lesson now. The light fades here a lot faster than at home in Finland. While I’m still composing and trying to find a good frame the sun disappears and it’s get’s very quickly very dark.

I still have a 8-9 km walk ahead of me and head home along the paths on the cliffs in the dark. Luckily I was prepared for that and had a flashlight with me.

After some time I arrive in my apartment, set my alarm clock to three o’clock. I plan to return to todays location in the morning to do some images from the other side of the cove at sunrise.

  1. I can really relate to your experience with poor light in a new location. Very often I travel very far to get a shot and then come away empty handed. Then I look on flickr and see that just a few days later some lucky photographer got the conditions I wanted. I think that's part of the joy of landscape photography; you do get a lot of disappointments but when you get the good light & everything comes together it is a fantastic feeling.

  2. The southwest of england can be a true nightmare for photographers,
    I grew up about 60 miles away from cornwall, and although back then i wasn't into photography,
    i can relate to how fast the conditions change especially on the north coast.
    Great post always nice to read about my old "home"

    • Hi Dave,

      glad you like my post. The weather changed indeed quite fast, but somehow I like it. At least something happens. Around here, it's only occasionally changing fast, though in the north of Norway I experienced similar, fast and drastic changes. Usually it gives very dramatic images.

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