Neil Gaiman – 'Reading Aloud'

We have an obligation to read aloud to our children. To read them things they enjoy. To read them stories we are already tired of. To do the voices, to make it interesting and not to stop reading to them just because they they learn to read to themselves. We have an obligation to use reading-aloud time as bonding time, as time where no phones are being checked, when the distractions of the world are put aside.

Neil Gaiman – The View From the Cheap Seats

The Morning Routine: Frasier Crane

“Let us get something clear. I am not a morning person. I have to ease into my day slowly. First I have my coffee – sans eggshells or anything else one tends to pick out of the garbage. Then I have a low-fat, high-fiber breakfast. Finally I sit down and read a crisp, new newspaper. If I am robbed of the richness of my morning routine, I cannot function. My radio show suffers, and like ripples in a pond, so do the many listeners that rely on my advise, to help them through their troubled lives. I’m sorry if this may sound priggish, but I have grown comfortable with this part of myself. It is the magic that is me.”

Frasier Crane in Space Quest

Quote Stephen King

“Painting. Sculpture. Composing. Singing. Acting. The playing of a musical instrument. Writing. Enough books have been written on these seven subjects alone to sink a fleet of luxury liners. And the only thing we seem to be able to agree upon about them is this: that those who practice these arts honestly would continue to practice them even if they were not paid for their efforts; even if their efforts were criticized or even reviled; even on pain on imprisonment or death. To me, that seems to be a pretty fair definition of obsessional behavior. It applies to the plain hobbies as well as the fancy one we call “the arts”.”

Stephen King in: _Foreword to Nightshift_

Herbie Hancock: 'A Great Teacher'

“A great teacher is one who realizes that he himself is also a student and whose goal is not to dictate the answers, but to stimulate his students’ creativity enough so that they go out and the answers themselves.”

Herbie Hancock in The Jazz Musicians Guide To Creative Practicing P.6