Day One Encryption

In Day One Encryption:

This approach allows us to continue developing additional applications and services for Day One, like our web and Android apps (currently in beta),

Encryption is great but I am almost more interested into the web-version and the Android version, which would make it more usable for me. Currently I’m using Journey (which is a nice, cross-platform app), but would switch back to DayOne for IFTTT integration alone. I’m not good at all at daily journaling but if I can automate at least some entries, that would already be helpful.

‘Trying to compare the two as if they were parallel just doesn’t make sense’

In Apple’s Android upgrade jabs don’t tell the whole story :

So, yes: Android OS upgrades are not a stately situation. Apple’s pie chart doesn’t lie about that. What those stunning circles don’t tell you, though, is that OS upgrades on Android play an extremely different role than OS upgrades on iOS. Google has deliberately shifted much of Android’s core functionality away from the operating system and into standalone apps — apps that are then updated instantly and universally, numerous times a year, without any manufacturer or carrier involvement and without any direct connections to the OS itself.

J.R.Raphael nails it here. Android updates are a pain in the butt, but core-functionalities are added and updated many times a year. To me this makes sense. All of Google’s apps get updates all the time, which is much more exciting than waiting for the yearly (or twice yearly incremental update).

‘You may be drinking something that gives a burn from top to bottom’

Matt Gemmell in Whisky:

Whisky, like any non-clear spirit, is an acquired taste – and I mean acquired in the same way that we acquire wealth, or possessions: it takes work. You have to actually decide that you’re going to drink it. That’s the first step.The next step is that you do drink it, and then usually you wish you hadn’t.

One of my favourite articles from Matt and since I have gotten recently not only one, but two, bottles of scotch as a gift, I am about ready to give them a try.

‘A Plethora of Space Operas’

In A Plethora of Space Operas: Where to Start With the Work of John Scalzi

I have tons of favorite authors, but there’s something special about finding that first author in whatever your favorite genre is that can tell a story that makes you go, “I want more of this immediately.” After reading Old Man’s War, I devoured all the work by Scalzi that I could afford to buy and then started waiting for him to publish more

Even though I am still not finished with the Expanse series, I am already looking forward to read something new. I have read one novella by Scalzi which was very nice and am interested in more. In this article are some good suggestions.

"To find the best things in the history of the internet"

In “A Time Capsule for the World Wide Web” blogger Tim Carmody asked the readers of Kottke.org to show him “What’s the best you got?” with the quest to find the best things in the history of the internet.

The result is this series of posts, which take quite a bit of time to go through. There is a lot of great stuff in there. Some familiar (to me) and lot’s of new stuff. Many things to explore.

Check out the posts here.

'Get out of Nuzzel for a few minutes during your lunch break and try some indie blogs'

Gabe of Macdrifter in ‘If You Like Indie Blogs then Share Them’:

Is this it then? Is this the last gasp of independent blogging as everyone moves to micro transactions of half considered thoughts? Will Tweets eat WordPress? … By my estimation, the best way to show that I support indie blogging is to recommend some of the sites I read. Page views are the real currency of the internet.

A great post by Gabe and a reminder to everyone to read and share more blogs, not sites. I enjoy blogging and read blogs (which I why you read this here) and agree with Gabe: the best way to support, is to share them.

My list and write-up will be up in a couple of days.

Tuesday Jazz – Chet Baker: The Last Great Concert

Chet Baker is one of my all-time favourites and recently I have been on a little binge-listen of the “The Last Great Concert”  recordings. The recordings with Big Band and Strings, recorded in 1988 only weeks before his death, feature him in great form.

From All About Jazz:

The concert itself was a hugely ambitious project, given Baker’s reputation for unreliability. To back Baker: a big band and a full orchestra on stage at the same time, in addition to a jazz quartet. Baker didn’t show up for rehearsals, and he didn’t arrive at the concert hall until the afternoon of the show. In spite of that, he—and by turns the orchestra and big band and quintet—sounds marvelous. Baker fits his solos into the arrangements seamlessly.

In times, in which, at least it feels like, Jazz is getting more complicated, intellectual, but in my opinion not always more beautiful, it is great to listen to listen to these recordings which are plain, great music.

I have never been able to find them on Spotify (and still am not), but I found both recording available to play on Google Play Music. You can listen to  Vol.1 My Favourite Songs here, and Vol.2 – Straight from the Heart here.